Respond to  2 students discussion using the rise Model Due Saturday January 27,

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Respond to  2 students discussion using the rise Model
Due Saturday January 27, 2024 by 10:00 pm
NOTE: This is a School Counseling Course
Must Read Everything: 
Reply to at least two classmate’s posts, applying the RISE Model for Meaningful Feedback
I will also show an example below of how the response needs to be addressed.
Here’s an example of how the response should look. Please don’t copy it. 
The response to the classmate need to be just like this. 
Example Response (Response Needs to be writen just like the response below No copying)
RISE Feedback:
REFLECT: I concur with “Action plans should reflect the type of services that are needed and have an idea of the expected outcome of the services” because it is in line with Hatch and Hartline’s intentional school counseling guidelines in regards to determining students needs.
INQUIRE: Can you further explain what “closing-the-gap action plans” are? 
SUGGEST: I encourage you to revisit Hatch and Hartline’s MTMDSS tier interventions in order to add a citation that would illustrate your example on bullying prevention efforts. 
ELEVATE: What if you re-purposed “For example, after a needs assessment, the school is having problems with bullying” as “Following Trish Hatch’s MTMDSS tier based interventions, if the school is having problems with bullying, after a needs assessment, we could… citation…”  for a more weighted argument?
ReferencesHatch, T., & Hartline, J. (2022). The use of data in school counseling: Hatching results (and so much more) for students, programs and the profession (2nd Ed.). Corwin.
****PLEASE RESPOND IN DEPTH***************************************************
Classmate response 1- Ashley
How have school counselors in your school or district established appropriate boundaries between themselves, teachers, administrators, and their students?
According to the ASCA Ethical StandardsLinks to an external site., school counselors must “Monitor their emotional and physical health and practice wellness to ensure optimal professional effectiveness. School counselors seek physical or mental health support to ensure professional competence.” (2022) My supervisor, the counselor, establishes appropriate boundaries with teachers by not giving out her cell phone number. Teachers often ask so they can access her outside of the radio and office phone. The counselor learned a tough lesson early in her career after sharing her phone number with a first-year teacher who often needed help with class management. She misused her cell phone number by calling often, which became excessive. To rectify the situation, the counselor expressed her gratitude and dedication to students, explained her availability and role, and enforced her limits by not answering outside school hours. She was firm but empathetic, acknowledging the teacher’s concerns. Eventually, the teacher better understood the counselors, administrators, and her role, allowing her to contact the counselor only when necessary. Creating boundaries was essential, as the student-to-counselor ratio of 950:1 often created time constraints, not allowing her to focus solely on the needs of one teacher.
Reference
American School Counselor Association (n.d.). ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors. Retrieved January 21, 2023, from https://www.schoolcounselor.org/
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Classmate Response 2- Claudia
Describe your experiences with educational transitional strategies 
Recently, the middle school counselors at my internship site have been preparing to take 8th grade students on tours to various high schools in the district. The counselors have put up fliers in the school, asked advisory teachers to inform students about the benefits of going to an open house at high school, and they have emailed parents. Very few students have signed up to take the tours. Even though the students would be allowed to miss school to go on the field trip with their class peers, there is a pervasive attitude amongst many students at the school that the tours are not cool. And that “prepping” for high school is for nerds. It’s ironic as the students have many questions about the transition to high school when you talk to them independently. 
As an advisory coordinator at my previous school, I worked with teachers, parents and students on middle school transition. We would start prepping the students for the move up to middle school early on in their last year of primary school. One of the things that we did was to organize gender peer groups where students could share experiences about school and their personal feelings. Conversations would almost certainly lead to middle school questions on everything from changing classes, using lockers, bullying, homework, to dating. Towards the end of the school year we would hold a “step-up day” where students visited middle school and would spend the day taking various middle school classes. (The students even took PE). Middle school students face a range of educational challenges as they navigate academic, social, physical and personal development. Transition challenges in middle school occur both in entering into middle school and exiting into high school. Transitional programs are necessary to help students adjust during these very important years of education and development.

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