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The 300 Year War
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Discussion 1.pngIntroduction
This discussion for Unit 7 covers the week`s readings. The goal of these discussions is to encourage you to read carefully and think broadly and deeply about the material.
One of the most difficult professors I had in my Ph.D. program was Roger Spiller because he made us think about thinking and think about the material very deeply. We get so busy with life that we eschew time for deep thinking, but the thinking skills required in this course and in the Military History major are important life and career skills. I want you to make time in this course, and I have designed it with that in mind. We read less material more carefully and try to have the time to really think about it. This goal makes the discussion an important and major part of the class assessment. Your initial post is due by midnight on Thursday of each week, with your response post due by midnight on Sunday each week. These will be assessed using the discussion rubric, which is available in several places in the course. The majority of the assessment points go to the content and thinking of the initial post. Part of the assessment is dedicated to the response to a classmate. Please note, also, that a part of the assessment addresses writing conventions. Clear and clean writing is a critical part of what historians do.
1) Analyze the importance of and consequences of the 300-Years War
Describe the motives and characteristics of the Indian Wars, using specific examples. How did military policies and goals change after the Civil War? How were these policies and goals reflected in military changes and in the role of soldiers? How did renewed and continuing warfare with Native Americans initiate changes in policies and goals and in the strategy and application of warfare? What were the consequences of the Indian Wars?
As we noted a bit last unit, the bulk of the Union soldiers sent out west to subjugate American Indians after the Civil War were black Americans who had served in the Civil War and served so well that Congress created entire black units of infantry and cavalry. Unfortunately, these men were sent out west for a very difficult and unpleasant duty. As we have seen from the beginning of the course, the first European encounters with the Indigenous peoples they found in the new world usually led to conflict and violence. This week, we take another look at the American Indian Wars, which Peter Maslowski includes in his study of the 300-Years War. Continuation of black service in the West was not the only legacy of the American Civil War. Sheridan, Grant, Sherman, and Custer took Civil War tactics out West against indigenous peoples, with tragic results. While the Indian Wars are not the only topic of this unit`s readings, we will do our best to cover our bases.
This unit, we read Millett: Chapter 8; Moten: Hall and Maslowski; and one article. We will have one discussion over the readings.
Readings and Materials
Textbook Readings
Millett: Chapter 8
Moten: Maslowski
Websites
Army War College – Podcasts
Journal Articles
Barton C. Hacker, `The United States Army as a National Police Force: The Federal Policing of Labor Disputes, 1877-1898`

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