IMPORTANT: Make sure to send me a rough draft 20 minutes before the 3 hour mark,

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IMPORTANT: Make sure to send me a rough draft 20 minutes before the 3 hour mark, and if you can, finish the order before the 3 hour mark. you will choose 1 out of 3 options. These options consist of excerpts from academic articles on the short story “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. You will compose a 750-1000 word essay using both the story & the excerpt from the article. As with the Research Essay, this essay will draw on key quotes from the primary and secondary sources in its argument. It will have a clear essay structure of intro leading to thesis, 3 body paragraphs, followed by a conclusion. Any in-text citations will be made in MLA format. You may list the two sources in a Works Cited at the end of your essay/answer. Options:
Option 1
Secondary Source:
Wesley, Marilyn. “Truth and fiction in Tim O’Brien’s “If I Die in a Combat Zone” and “The Things They Carried.” College Literature, vol. 29, no. 2, 2002, pp. 1-18.
(excerpt)
“…’The Things They Carried’ invokes and revises two key devices of generic war fiction: the structure of dramatic action and the focal representation of the officer. Buried within this narrative is a conventional plot. A platoon of infantrymen from Alpha Company, led by Lieutenant Jimmy Cross, is on a mission to destroy Viet Cong “villes” and tunnels. The seventeen men-among them, Ted Lavender, Lee Strunk, Rat Kiley, Henry Dobbins, Mitchell Sanders, Dave Jensen, Norman Bowker, Kiowa, and Tim O’Brien, characters who recur throughout the collection-are especially uneasy when they discover a tunnel. Standard operating procedure demands that one of their number, chosen by lot, crawl inside and explore before they blow it up, a maneuver literally dangerous and psychologically unnerving. On the day of the story, Lee Strunk is unlucky enough to have to descend. The others, worried for him and uneasily aware of their own mortality, await his eventual reemergence. Although Strunk returns unscathed, Ted Lavender, the most frightened of the group, is later shot while urinating. A helicopter is summoned to remove his body, and the men respond to his death in a variety of ways: relief, humor, hysterical grief, and the destruction of the nearby village of Than Khe.
This imposed dramatic structure of violation and resolution, which makes violent death and chaotic response comprehensible is not adapted by the story, which is, instead, organized as lists of actual and emotional burdens toted by the soldiers. The things they carry include the accoutrements of war, such as steel helmets, which, O’Brien carefully notes, weigh 5 pounds; the particular objects of their military duties, the 23-pound M-60 of the machine gunner or the medic’s bag of “morphine and plasma and malaria tablets and surgical tape and comic books … for a total weight of almost 20 pounds” (1990, 6-7); and the heavier load of fear and whatever the men rely on to cope with fear, like Ted Lavender’s drugs, Kiowa’s bible, and Jimmy Cross’s love letters.
In Writing War Hanley contends that modern military narratives are suffused with a “secret unacknowledged elation’ at the thought of war, with the conviction that war is exciting,”2 and that this style of representation has promoted war as a desirable societal event (1991, 4). But by presenting violence in terms of burden rather than battle through deliberately non-dramatic structure, by stressing the continuous pressure of war rather than the climactic action of combat through the metaphor of weight to be borne, “The Things They Carried” deflates the excitement of traditional portrayal of the violence of the military adventure, and it deflects the ascription of moral purpose to the violent events of war.”
Option 2:
Aqeeli, Ammar A. “Tim O’Brien’s Representation of the Subjugated Other’s Voice Against War in The Things They Carried.” Ars Aeterna : Literary Studies and Humanity, vol. 12, no. 2, Sciendo, 2020, pp. 20–33.
(excerpt)
” A number of critics have concluded that O’Brien’s The Things They Carried is more interested in portraying the American experience of the war more than the Vietnamese one. For instance, Jen Dunnaway argues that literary works about the Vietnam War perpetuate American ethnocentrism by “[reinforcing] the centrality of the white perspective . . . in the text” (2008, p. 117). Similarly, Renny Christopher claims that O’Brien’s work is another American war narrative that puts the American perspective at the centre of its analysis. She suggests that O’Brien’s novel fails to address the war’s repercussions on the Vietnamese. […]
In contrast, other critics explored O’Brien’s idea that the war is antithetical to anything human, moral or good. While it is true that all characters on the Vietnamese side are nameless and voiceless, which makes it irresist
The attached files are examples of how this should be written (Only the part 2 sections) Also the short story Tim O_Brien – The Things They Carried is attached too in the files

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