Continue Your Discussion: Gap Analysis This week, discuss your thoughts related

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Continue Your Discussion: Gap Analysis
This week, discuss your thoughts related to elements to be included in a gap analysis.
Here are some ideas to get you started. Choose one to respond to for the discussion this week.
What forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination result from the policy you’ve selected? Discuss a case study that illustrates the negative impacts of the policy.
How many people are negatively impacted by the current social policy? Is there a ripple effect from these consequences? If so, how does it manifest?
Share an outside resource (image, video, article, research study, recording) that provides insight into the practice or importance of gap analysis. Share the link within your post and explain why you chose to share it.
Explain which of this week’s concepts, resources, or activities is of most interest to you and your professional development. Offer some specific examples.
Please note:
Respond to your classmates, share your ideas, experiences, and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building upon the connections you have made to the material so far? Don’t forget, you can love or like their posts too. When writing your post:
If you wish, include links to credible professional or scholarly articles, videos, images, or other Web resources to support your post or provide examples. Explain how these links are relevant to the conversation.
PLEASE RESPOND TO CLASSMATE FR:
The current social policy regarding migrant farmworkers in the United States has a significant and multifaceted impact on both the workers themselves and the broader agricultural sector, leading to a ripple effect of consequences.
https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/laws-and-regulations/laws/mspa
Firstly, many migrant farmworkers live under challenging conditions. A significant portion of these workers, about 61%, have incomes falling below the poverty level, with a median income of less than $7500 a year. This leads to a situation where many feel trapped in farm work, with few other viable options and the shame of returning to their homelands with less than what they came with. The lack of legal status for a large number of these workers, approximately 44%, exacerbates their vulnerability, leading to increased instances of injustice and abuse. They often cannot protest inadequate conditions or report violations due to fear of displacement and deportation. This situation undermines their ability to have a voice, agency, and advocacy, effectively rendering them invisible within the broader society.
Health-wise, migrant farmworkers face severe risks due to the physically demanding nature of their work and inadequate living conditions. Heat-related illnesses, exposure to pesticides, injuries, infections, and mental health issues like depression are common among these workers. These health challenges are compounded by barriers to accessing healthcare, including prohibitive costs, a lack of culturally appropriate services, fear of reporting to authorities for undocumented workers, and the inability to get sick leave. The agricultural sector itself is impacted by the challenges faced by migrant farmworkers. There is an ageing trend among immigrant workers in agriculture, with fewer young immigrant workers replacing the older ones. This situation, coupled with the reluctance of Americans to take up demanding farm jobs, has led to labour shortages. The H-2A visa, intended to address this issue, is often too expensive and cumbersome for many growers. This shortage of workers has slowed the growth in the volume of crops produced in the U.S. Consequently, there is an increasing reliance on imported foods to meet consumer demand, particularly for fresh fruits and vegetables.
In conclusion, the current social policy towards migrant farmworkers has profound implications, both for the workers themselves and the U.S. agricultural sector. The challenges faced by these workers ripple out to affect the broader economy, food production, and societal health and well-being.
Fyi: The Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act (MSPA) is a U.S. federal law designed to protect migrant and seasonal agricultural workers. It establishes standards related to wages, housing, transportation, disclosures, and recordkeeping. The Act also mandates the registration of farm labour contractors with the U.S. Department of Labor. Key components include provisions for worker safety, information disclosure to workers about their employment conditions, and specific requirements for recordkeeping by employers.

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